Character Spotlight: Cole from Dragon Age: Inquisition with Mod Knight!

Dragon Age: Inquisition is an excellent game full of varied and interesting characters, with deep and involved stories that draw you into the world of the game and it’s characters. However, none are quite as curious (or quite as mysterious) as Cole, the spirit of mercy.

When we first meet Cole in Inquisition, he appears before us within a twisted mindscape filled with demons and nightmares. At first, we’re left to assume that he is another one of the horrible visions that’s being used in an attempt to break the inquisitor’s spirit. However, after talking to him we discover that Cole is…different. He seems to be entirely concerned with helping people and granting them mercy.

After they return to Skyhold, Cole can be found doing cryptic things which, at first, seem like pranks or mischief. However, if you wait and talk to him, you’ll discover that these are all things done to help people throughout the castle.

Cole’s story is one of struggling to find an identity and place in the world. His struggles begin as he attempts to relate to humans, while he is a spirit and used to an entirely different form of communication. Therefore Cole might seem awkward or strange; however, he is just as intelligent and bright as the rest of the cast.

Another of Cole’s struggles is that of learning a method of coping with pain, pain being a feeling that spirits are not usually aware of. Cole himself is a spirit masquerading as a human whom he was unable to save and who he lives on as. The inquisitor is given the choice to help him come to terms with either his spirit nature, or the budding humanity within him. Interestingly, neither choice is correct or incorrect, as there are positives and negatives to both.

Ultimately, Cole is a fascinating character, one who finds a way to do what he deems kindest, even if it may not be what others would expect! His disposition and ways of communication may throw people off at first, but deep down, is a compassionate soul who believes in doing the kind thing.

–Mod Knight

Character Spotlight: Morrigan from Dragon Age with Mod Loser!

Hey there, Nasties! This is Mod Loser, Jackie, whatever you want to call me. And I still have more characters I’m ready to rant about! Although, I feel very positively about Morrigan as opposed to Kairi. If you’ve played Dragon Age: Origins and Dragon Age: Inquisition you’re very well aware of Morrigan as a character, however the details of what makes Morrigan so fantastic are hidden in her romance and goals during Dragon Age: Origins.

While only men can romance Morrigan, what I find the most interesting is that she changes nothing about herself through the duration of the relationship. It’s made very clear she wants to have a child with the soul of the Archdemon for selfish, powerful reasons, and your character goes along with it. Much of Morrigan’s romance arc also involves coping with the fact that her mother, Flemeth, supposedly has been stealing the bodies of her daughters to gain immortality.

Rather than simply running and “protecting,” Morrigan, she demands that you both go attack and kill her mother. Flemeth may not truly die in this encounter, but it speaks volumes about Morrigan. As an individual, she is accepting of her own violent tendencies and doesn’t feel guilt or shame about protecting herself, she has her own desires and goals that do not disappear when romanced. In the DLC Witch Hunt, at the very end, you can choose to leave the world with Morrigan; to live with her, sacrificing your job as a Grey Warden for her ambition. This is very forward–to display a man in a role that is supportive to the woman in serious relationships. And that is something that I respect greatly about Morrigan and her romance.

Morrigan is still, however, a dynamic character. She does learn, over time, the value of a life as well as the value of her loved ones during Dragon Age: Origins, and this is on full display in Dragon Age: Inquisition when she is ready to murder Flemeth “again,” to protect her son. That doesn’t stop Morrigan from seeking, albeit selfishly, immense power during the story of Inquisition.

To put it bluntly, neither motherhood nor romance changes who Morrigan is at her core, yet she does learn to have a more healthy relationship with her loved ones and husband (who chooses actively to support her dreams and ambitions) rather than the stereotypical idea that the woman must support the man’s ambitions. Nasties, expect many articles about Dragon Age characters. Because they’re some of the best.

Thanks for reading! This is Mod Loser, Jackie, whatever you want to call me and I’m signing off!

Top 5 Best: Multiplatform Games with Mod Loser!

Hey there, Nasties! It’s Mod Loser, Jackie, whatever you want to call me. And today, we’re getting into multiplatform games! Third party titles can make or break a system just as much as not having good first party ones can, so let’s all get to the meat of the top 5 Multiplatform Third Party games!

Number 5: Elder Scrolls 4: Oblivion

A fantastic RPG for the Xbox 360, Playstation 3 and PC gamers, as well as my favorite elder scrolls game of all time. I adored that Oblivion had a heavy emphasis on an extreme amount of quests that actually felt pretty varied with their goals, as well as a lengthy and interesting main plot line.

What always drew me into Oblivion for replay value were quests with multiple endings given the choices you made, a Fame-and-Infamy meter that decided how the people around you viewed your character, and enchantment and spell creation. Making my own spells always felt too good! Most loyal Nasties know that I hate Skyrim, so I think its about time I give Oblivion the love that it deserves.

Number 4: Shovel Knight

Shovel Knight has come to Nintendo Switch, Wii U, Xbox One, Ps4, PC, and Nintendo 3DS, and I absolutely adore the game. I may not have been very good at the first Shovel Knight, but Specter of Torment drew me in moreso than any indie game yet. A perfect mixture of what felt like Castlevania meets Mega Man. The combat was fluid and challenging, while the platforming was fun and fair.

Shovel Knight, Specter Knight, and Plague Knight may be indie games, but what I adore about them is that they have such broad appeal with tight gameplay that it was important to put them on every console possible. I firmly believe that anyone looking for some nostalgic gameplay or just a good action platformer should pick up this game immediately.

Number 3: Mass Effect 2

A game released on Xbox 360, Playstation 3, and PC. Do I honestly need to sing the praises of Mass Effect 2 to anyone? This was, in my opinion, the best Sci-Fi RPG I have ever played in my life, and I thoroughly enjoyed Knights of the Old Republic. Mass Effect two had great controls, had a power system that added flavor to third person shooting, a character creator that was stellar for the era, and fantastic characters.

Mass Effect 2 kept me coming back over and over each time purely because of how much I loved the romance, the characters,and the multiple ways I could end the game. This game wasn’t perfect by any means, which I understand. But to this day, if anybody asks for a Sci-Fi game recommendation, Mass Effect 2 will be the first game I suggest.

Number 2: Dark Souls 3

Released on Xbox One, Playstation 4, and PC. I adore Dark Souls; this isn’t anything new to our fans! I could sing the praises of this game for far too long, but suffice to say it’s a fantastic entry into the souls franchise, and from what I can tell, it has been a great starting point for many people. The story is fantastic and the gameplay tighter than ever, with weapon skills and the FP bar. I also found the DLC to be incredibly enjoyable; however, with the Fire Fades edition, you can now purchase the game together with the DLC. If you want to try a Dark Souls game, now is the time.

Number 1: Dragon Age Inquisition

Released on Xbox One, Playstation 4, and PC. This is, without a doubt, my favorite Western RPG of all time. I could not accurately describe how much I adore Dragon Age Inquisition. With great Queer representation, so many amazing and depthy party members, massive worlds and areas to explore with great quests both side quests and main story, I don’t think I’ll love another western RPG as much as I have loved Dragon Age.

Unfortunately for myself, despite having the DLC, I have yet to play through it all which is a shame. Even so, just the core game was so long and enjoyable and intense; I would recommend this game to just about anybody who likes fantasy RPG’s. From killing dragons to slaying demons, get ready to lead the Inquisition.

Well Nasties, did you enjoy my list? How about you; what are your favorite multiplatform games that have been release? Tell us in the comments below your thoughts. 

This has been Mod Loser, Jackie, whatever you want to call me, signing off!

Tropes in Gaming: No Guy Wants an Amazon with Mod Aria!

Welcome to another installment of our new segment, Tropes in Gaming. Mod Aria’s here today, and I’m going to discuss a trope that particularly frustrates me. It’s called “No Guy Wants an Amazon”, and it has some really toxic implications in it; especially when prominent in video games.

The “No Guy Wants an Amazon” trope highlights the idea of overtly masculine women. These are women who do not take part in what we would call “feminine acts” and take part in seemingly “masculine acts”. The name “Amazon” comes from the idea that many Amazon women rejected femininity due to their love for battle and for their size. The “Amazons” from the trope are women who reject make-up and dancing in exchange for “masculine” hobbies like swordplay and sports. They are also typically muscular and strong despite their size.

More specifically, the trope emphasizes that men abhor these “masculine women” because they do not find them attractive in comparison to “feminine women”. Honestly, it’s obvious from the start why this trope is incredibly toxic. But, let’s go one step at a time. And while this trope may seem like it does not appear in video games, it certainly does! Nasty Woman Gaming has discussed Dragon Age frequently, and it shouldn’t be a surprise to learn that this trope is quite evident in the series.

We can start with Dragon Age: Origins. In some of the female origin stories, your Hero is often scolded by their families for loving the idea of fighting. Your father in the City Elf story discourages you from letting your potential husband learn about your combat training; it might scare him away. In the Human Noble story, your mother makes very similar comments; she goes far enough to insult you for letting yourself be seen training.

This notion appears again in Dragon Age 2 and Inquisition. First, there’s Aveline Vallen. Aveline is a soldier of Fereldan and also the eventual Guard Captain of Kirkwall. She is strong and wears gender-neutral armor, but she is constantly mocked for how “unfeminine” she is. Isabela incessantly ridicules Aveline for frightening men due to her rejection of traditional femininity. In Dragon Age Inquisition you have Cassandra, who feels she is also too frightening for men to approach.

The problem that arises from this trope is the dynamic between men and women who do not subscribe to traditional gender roles. It paints “masculine” women as undesirable solely because “masculine” women are not considered attractive to cisgendered, heterosexual men. Toxic masculinity has ingrained in us ideas of what women and men should be like. And when we don’t conform to those ideas, we are deemed ugly or freakish.

And I’m not necessarily saying that the Dragon Age games are wrong for using this trope; often it is averted due to the nature of how other characters handle it. However, that does not mean it isn’t without reproach. What Dragon Age and other video games should learn from this trope is that deciding what about yourself is good or bad based on a man’s level of desire for you is unhealthy and sexist. Too often are these “masculine” women treated disrespectfully for the sake of humor.

It’s time for us to wake up and realize that “masculine” and “feminine” labels are inherently meaningless. We as a human race decided what traits, colors, sounds and the like were considered “masculine” and “feminine”.

And now we are the ones with the power to wake others up to the truth: that a woman is a woman if she says she is. That a man is a man if he says he is. That no one has to conform to the gender binary.

That what someone thinks of us doesn’t matter; we are perfect just the way we are. 


Thank you so much for reading this article! Please continue to support NWG.

— Mod Aria/Sam