Knight Reviews: Dream Daddy: A Dad Dating Simulator

Hey there, everyone! Mod Knight here to talk about an amazing game with you! This time, I’m talking about Dream Daddy! If you’re unfamiliar with it, Dream Daddy is an LGBT dad dating sim in which you play the part of a dad dating other dads! It’s already an amazing concept and the game follows through flawlessly on it’s premise; not only that, but it’s full of incredible characters, deep, emotional stories, and lots and lots of dad jokes.

So! What’s the Number 1 thing that makes, or breaks a dating sim? Well, it’s the characters, no doubt. The cast of Dream Daddy is not only diverse, but super lovable, too. One thing I really enjoy about the premise of a dad dating sim is that that means that there are kids involved, too! Not only are the dads excellent, but the kids range from adorable to hilarious. Speaking of kids, we mustn’t forget the most important character in the game. Her name is Amanda, she is your daughter and you. WILL. LOVE. HER.

Image result for dream daddy AMANDAI mean, you’re her dad; it’s your job. But also, she’s an amazing girl who will pull on your heart and never let go. The story and writing for her do an amazing job of pulling you close to her extremely quickly, and really make you feel involved and concerned for her! Of course, being a dad isn’t easy, and the game does a great job of replicating the struggle.

Of course, we cant just spend the whole time talking about Amanda (though I could write a whole article on her). Because the game is dripping with amazing characters, especially in the dad department! From the sweet and nerdy Hugo, the brawny and boisterous Brian, and the cool, gritty Robert, every dad is an amazing character with their own story, interests and personalities.

One thing that I especially loved about the game is that, with many dating sims, it’s easy to get a handle on the characters quickly and understand their entire personality at a glance. Dream Daddy’s love interests, however, continually reveal layers of themselves that you’d never have guessed just from looking at them! And each layer only serves to make you love them even more because you get to know them not only as a romantic interest, but as a friend!

One other thing I enjoyed was the level of diversity the game included! Despite being a men focused dating sim, it still is chock full of interesting female characters, not to mention POC, bi, and trans representation! The game does an amazing job of showing the diverse spectrum of people in the world, even though it’s a simple game set around suburban America.

Also, you get to build a dad-sona and that’s awesome.

Overall, Dream Daddy absolutely blew me away! I’ve yet to cover everything I have to say about the game, however I think I’ll go more in depth on certain topics in future articles, as this is a game I’d like to cover thoroughly!


Thanks for reading everyone!

Top 5: Most Annoying Anti-Feminist Game Tropes with Mod Zan!

Hey guys, gals, and non-binary pals! It’s Mod Zan, back with another article for you all to enjoy! In this article, we’re going to talk about some of the most irritating anti-feminist tropes in gaming. There are many, many more anti-feminist tropes in media and gaming than the 5 I’m going to mention in this list, but these are some that I see most frequently and that irritate me a bit more than the usual. Without further ado, here’s my list for you to enjoy!

5. Unrealistic Armor

This is one of the most discussed issues in feminist gaming that is commonly discussed in feminist gaming circles, and the fact that it’s still relevant enough to be put on the list today says everything that I could possibly say. Particularly relevant in fantasy games, armor that barely covers the female form in games is definitely a major distraction from a video game that might have many other merits to it. It detracts from both the design of the character and their story, and contributes to the prevalent issue of the sexualization of female characters in gaming that continually reappears no matter how far we progress socially. There are many culprits of this, including Quiet from Metal Gear, Morrigan from Dragon Age, any woman from Mortal Kombat, etc. This issue should have already been solved, and the fact that it still exists is what makes it so difficult.

4. The Chick (or One Token Girl)

I believe that this is also one of the most frequently discussed issues in feminist critique of games. There are quite a few games with a cast, or a team, that only has one girl and her only purpose appears to exist as her gender, and to take care of the rest of the team. This is slightly less prevalent than most other tropes in video games, but the existence of a single female character (unintentionally or not) is yet another trope that reduces the character to her gender identity and usually forces her into feminine or mother-like stereotypes. Even if she is an action girl.

3. Shallow Woman

I’m using the Shallow Woman for the purposes of this article to encompass a few different tropes that I tend to see frequently. She’s the trophy wife, the gold digger, the empty-headed adversary of the teenage girl and the evil stepmother. Any woman who is presented as having interests in things that are stereotypically feminine like shopping, makeup, acting, etc. is usually presented as being without purpose and existing to be shrill, catty, and an annoyance to the main character. Michael’s family in GTA V is the perfect example of this, as well as even some of the pre-made Sims (Dina Caliente, anyone?) in the Sims 2 and 3, and even 4.

2. Fridging

We certainly can’t talk about irritating tropes in games without talking about Fridging. Mod Knight wrote an entire article dedicated to breaking down this trope, which you should certainly check out if you have more to say about this! But regardless, fridging is something that we see far too often in video games. Women are constantly thrown under the metaphorical bus in order to further the development of the male characters in the game that are considered to be more important. Some examples of this are prevalent in many AAA games, such as in Arkham Knight with Barbara Gordon, Aerith in Final Fantasy 7, and Talion’s wife in Shadow of Mordor.

1. Prize to be Won (Also known as Standard Hero Reward)

There’s a lot of games that push this classic trope in ways that may not be obvious at first, but since this trope is older than time, it makes it harder to stomach now. Donkey Kong, Mario, and Legend of Zelda are some examples of the trope in its rawest sense, with princesses available for the protagonist to date or marry at the conclusion of the game. Unlockable outfits go back to the first trope that I discussed with unrealistic clothes, but also imply something more sinister about the female characters in games. It insinuates that their bodies are on display for the voyeuristic gaze of the player as an award, and thus that women’s bodies are an object to be earned with enough work.

Overall, these are all tropes that present harmful views about women, sexuality and their relationship to men. Objectification, sexualization, and in Anita Sarkeesian’s own words, trophisim is prevalent in all of the above discussed. The patriarchal nature of video games is what influences the existence of these tropes in the first place, and discussing them is integral to ensuring that we can make better games in the future that don’t involve these. Each trope I mentioned is likely to receive a full article about it in the future if it does not already have one, and I look forward to analyzing them all in greater detail with all of you!

Thanks for reading, and I’ll see you next time!.

Zan Reviews: Saints Row 4!

Hey guys, gals, and non-binary pals! It’s Mod Zan, here to present to you another game review! In this article, I’m going to be talking about a game that’s been out for a while but deserves to be scrutinized by my ever-present feminist magnifying glass: Saints Row 4. As usual, I’m going to discuss Visual and Audio, Gameplay, and Story. Let’s get started with Visual and Audio first!

Visual and Audio: The visuals in Saints Row 4 fit in with the feeling of the series. They’re goofy, bright, and it’s clear that they weren’t taken too seriously. For the most part, this is a good thing. It adds to the ridiculousness that separates the game from others in their genre, such as GTA V. However (especially when compared to the third one), it’s difficult to ignore the fact that the two games have very little difference between them despite the gap in their time of release. The graphics are too realistic to be fully cartoon-like, and too cartoon-y to be considered realistic. I don’t necessarily think that this is a detriment to the game, but it’s certainly not to its credit either.

As far as character design goes, despite having a few good female characters present in the game that I’ll get into a little later, their design has a bit to be desired. Shaundi, Asha and Kinsey are the main female characters in the cast for this game, and though Asha and Kinsey have decent costumes, it’s hard to ignore how similar the design is and how sexualised they all become. Particularly when you unlock their superpowers and gain new costumes. Asha suffers the least from this treatment, and is also the only woman of color who has a main role in this game. Though the game is raunchy and never shies away from sexuality regardless of gender, it would be unfair to pretend that there’s no difference in the way this is handled between the male and female members of the cast.

Gameplay: That being said, it’s worth recognizing this from the get-go: Saints Row 4 is a fun game to play. It keeps a lot of the things that I loved about the third one preserved, and adds new mechanics that make for a fun time as you unlock new superpowers and kick aliens into space in all kinds of new and interesting ways. The weapons that they added in are even more outlandish and give you all kinds of new experiences through each fight, which helps break up some of the monotony that you end up falling into as the game continues.

Though it is a fun experience for players of all skill levels, after you punch the four billionth alien fighter into the sun, you start to wonder if there isn’t more to life than just running through a (spoiler) simulation, smashing aliens and setting cars ablaze. Though the combat is funny and engaging at first, as you move through the game it starts to feel far too similar to Saints Row the Third, and not in a good way.

Story: Saints Row 4, as its predecessors before it, has never been known for its moving story. Though the characters are relatively well-done, and even sympathetic at some points, Saints Row 4 does not boast an interesting story. You fight to destroy an alien species that has already destroyed earth by destroying the simulation they put you in to destroy you. My biggest complaint with the story of this was the revelation that none of the things that you did were going to be real because of your imprisonment in the alien simulation. Though the villain was easy to despise and the main characters easy to root for, I never felt particularly motivated to complete many of the main missions because I felt that without the fictional impact on the real world, it rendered some of the fun of the game moot.

Though the ending of the game was as satisfying as it could be with earth floating in space in a million pieces, it left me wanting to go back and play through the third game again and with very little desire to replay. The real charm in this game was in the minor interactions and character side quests that you had with the other members of the cast, right down to the Mass Effect romance parody that you could go through with every member of your crew (save the vice president), regardless of gender.

Representation in Saints Row is surprisingly sufficient considering the genre; Asha, Pierce, Keith Davis, and Benjamin King are all POC, and with Kinsey and Shaundi added in only leaves Matt Miller as the white man on board the ship with the option for the player to choose the protagonists appearance. There is a lot to be desired in-game when it comes to including better character design for the girls as previously stated. Though the design is lacking in some places, there are a lot of great moments with Shaundi throughout the game as you deal with her guilt surrounding Johnny’s death and help her deal with her feelings about her past self. The team wouldn’t function without Kinsey, and she never is presented as anything less than fully capable even with the introduction of Matt Miller, who has similar skills.

Additionally, there were some compulsory romances (Asha and Matt) that didn’t seem to make much sense, particularly given their difference in personality and complete lack of interest in one another at the start. There is surely more to talk about considering the amount of content in this game, but this is the gist of what I gathered while playing it.

In conclusion: though Saints Row 4 is a good time for people who aren’t looking for anything serious, it’s difficult for me to recommend it when you could get the third one and have a better story and a slightly better experience. However, as far as representation goes, I believe that this is one of the best in the series and opens up the floor for the inclusion of more diverse casts of characters even in games that are traditionally marketed to a heterosexual male audience!

I think that we have a lot to look forward to as they move forward with the series, and I will be cautiously looking forward to seeing what else they will include.